Managing Self-perceived High Profile People

I was watching Hell’s Kitchen Season 4 on YouTube these few days and one common recurring issue with the men’s team is that there is no teamwork and everyone’s ego is too big for their own good. During the episode, one of them realizes communication is an issue and tries to get everyone to think of how to improve communication. Yet nobody needs him, and some were so fixated over the comments that others had made about themselves that they only cared about trashing it out.

After the episode, I resumed my daily book reading. The current book I am on now is “Leadership lessons from West Point”. The chapter that I started reading today was on managing high profile people, and one point stood out. The chapter described how high profile people would work in a team typically: when they feel that they are doing more than their fair share of work, they reduce commitment and might even act out in destructive ways.

To me, that sums up my learning beautifully. The chefs who made it to the show probably had lots of confidence and ego. Each of them think they are the best and deserve to win Hell’s Kitchen. However the thing is, not all of them have that level of capability. Some might be just average. Their perceived high performance might have led them into thinking that they are the contributing more than anyone else; that they tried more than others and despite making mistakes, put in more effort to recover than others. That led to a dysfunctional team where communication breakdown and no one reaps the efficiencies derived from teamwork. That is why the men’s team kept losing their challenges.

This made me do some self reflection too. Sometimes I do think that I am doing more than my fair share of work. However today’s lesson made it clear that sometimes I perceived that I do more than my fair share. That might not be the case in real life and I must be self aware. In addition, others whom I think are not pulling their weight might feel that they are contributing more than their capacity. This is a good lesson in management that I will do well to remember.

“The map is not the territory”

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