A Letter to my Son

Son,

Today is the day that you are born. Your mother and I have been taking careful steps to reach this point, from the moment you are a fertilised egg to this moment ten months down. We tried our best to make sure that you will be safe, and whenever the elders advised for your mother not to consume certain food, we will obey. This meant that your mother couldn’t eat many of her favourite food.

In the first trimester, you didn’t seem to like vegetables or fish. Both were mummy’s favourite but she started dreading eating them during this time. As the months go on, your mummy’s appetite improved, and during the last few weeks prior to your birth, her appetite wasn’t good.

She also had to carry you everywhere she worked. As you grew heavier, she too felt the difficulty in taking every step. People on the train and buses pretended not to see her, and some aunty and uncles even stole her seat when a kind person gracefully offered their seat to your mother. You must not be so ungracious. As the days went by, your mother had to buy a waistband to help lessen the strain you placed on her back. It was difficult, and Daddy tried where possible to pick her up from work to bring her home.

We anticipated your arrival like any excited parent. We went to baby fairs to carefully select the cot that you would sleep in. We consulted our friends to see which stroller made the most sense, and which car seat was the most comfortable. We bought small toys thinking that you would like them, and bought your cute tiny clothes so that you would be our handsome son.

This week, when we visited Dr Kenneth, we discovered that your amniotic fluid had decreased. While not critical yet, we were worried that it would affect you. We monitored for a few days, and when the level of fluid further dropped during the Thursday check up, we made a decision to induce labour at Friday 0000H.

We checked into the delivery suite in the wee hours on Friday. I waited to submit the admission forms while having running nose and feeling sick. The nurses helped your mother to put medicine to induce labour. As the time passes, your mother’s cramps got worse and she was afraid that her cervix would not dilate adequately if she is not relaxed. As a result she took the epidural that she didn’t want to initially.

We waited for many hours for your mother to dilate first to 3cm, then to 7cm. The doctor predicted that you would be out about 3-4pm. Your mother continued to have contractions; luckily she couldn’t feel it due to the epidural. Near to 2pm, the nurse declared that your mother is ready and Dr Kenneth was called. Your mother worked hard to push you out. For forty minutes, she breathed in deeply and pushed multiple times during each contraction. Eventually, your head came out and Dr Kenneth pulled you out and placed you on top of mummy’s belly.

Words could not adequately describe my emotions when the scene unfolded before my very eyes. I could still feel like tearing as I write this letter. It felt surreal, and it was a wonderful thing that you were born. I was finally a dad. I was worried whether I was ready, but I am very excited to be your dad.

I followed you around as the nurses used a rubber tube to suck our the amniotic fluid from your nose and mouth. They weighed you and showed me every inch of your body. I counted your fingers and toes, and looked as they measured your head circumference and your height. I was still crying inside with tears of joy. I still couldn’t believe you were born.

We sent you to the nursery and Dr Watt visited you. The nurses cleaned you up and Daddy went to pick you up to meet your grandparents and aunts who have come to see you. Turn by turn, they carried you. Your paternal grandfather and I weren’t feeling well due to the cold/flu bug, so we got masks to cover our faces. When I finished my dinner (after not eating properly since the beginning of the 15 hour labour), it was my turn to carry you. You slept soundly in my arms. No words could express the pride I had of being your father. I now realise what your paternal grandfather meant when he said he loved me and that he would die for me. For that is how I felt. I loved you and you are now my life. I would do everything in my means for your mother and you to live well, safely and happily.

Soon you would grow up. You would go the path that I had gone. You would go into puberty, start becoming rebellious, and maybe we will slowly grow apart. But that is not what I want. I will try my best to be your friend and to understand you as an individual. I hope that you would always be close to your mother and I. No matter what we do for you in future to discipline you and guide you along in your life, we do it with the best intentions.

Your mother and I love you, my son, and maybe one day, when you become a father yourself, you would realise that too.

Love,

Papa

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2 thoughts on “A Letter to my Son

  1. Hmm I know this is a strange question, but was it awkward to see a male gynae? Why didnt you consider a female gynae?

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